Just now listening to Democracy Now on public radio. Amy Goodman said they have a job opening for a Linux administrator. No details.

Here's a good article on getting support for Linux. Most of these suggestions have already been suggested by our mentors. The item on using Google for help is great.

http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2012/09/the-5-best-sources-of-support-f...

In this quarter we will be dealing with networking and virtualization technology. Below you will find instructions about various aspects of computer networking. Read each set of instructions and try out the examples.

A brief update on my efforts.

I had made a Ubuntu Live USB thumb drive and it worked fine when booting with the thumb drive. But when I tried to install it on an HP laptop (32 bit), it didn't work. I just got a blank screen with a blinking cursor and couldn't do anything. Ross thought it could have been a driver issue. But then I made a Mint 13.0 XFCE Live USB thumb drive. This distribution is about the closest thing to a Windows environment, and that's what I would want the folks at SWOP to start off with.

As came up in our call, it would be great to have folks spend more time IRC, because that is where we (Ross and I) are every day, and because it is a tool that free software folks and techies use as a primary way to communicate.

Connection Details:
Server: irc.indymedia.org
Channels/ Chatrooms: #poctechies and #mayfirst

Clients:

Yesterday I made a LiveUSB stick with Ubuntu and was able to start up a Windows laptop with Ubuntu, pretty cool stuff. Then I did an Ubuntu install on the laptop. I went the easy way and didn't worry about partitions for now, as per Ross' suggestion. I can always re-install it, etc.

So it reformatted the hard drive, got rid of Windows, etc., and then it told me that the installation was successful and to restart the computer. I restarted it and now all i'm getting is a dark screen with the blinking cursor. I tried putting in my password, but that didn't help.

I was able to make my LiveUSB stick with Ubuntu today. I tested it on a Windows machine and was able to boot into Linux Ubuntu.

Tomorrow I'll deploy Linux on my soon to be Ex-Windows spare laptop. Hopefully it'll be easy. There's even an installer on the Ubuntu desktop.

Then once I'm back at my office (am in Califas now), I'll want to set up my office desktop computer and work laptop to dual boot with both Windows and Linux.

Hi All,

A couple of people asked for some exercises to get comfortable with using the command line, so here's exercise number 1. It should be fairly easy.

Goal 1: Create two different users one named "guest" and one named 'nohome' (You should also end up with a groups 'guest' and 'nohome'. The 'guest' user should have a home directory just like your regular user, but the 'nohome' user should not have a home directory.

Roberto recently asked a few interesting questions that seem worth answering as a blog post. Gnome Shell the windows manager we use has somewhat different interface than the traditional windows managers we're used to using.

We use a number of default commands for our gpg key creation and signing. The first thing you need to do is get a gpg or pgp key, if you haven't already. From the command line enter the following:

gpg --gen-key

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